Browse Modules

Author: Kathleen Abrahamson, PhD, RN
Institution: Western Kentucky University
This module introduces students to the relationships between age, race/ethnicity, gender, poverty, and disability. It also provides students with an opportunity to use census data to gather information about a target population.
Author: Maxine Atkinson
Institution: North Carolina State University
This activity provides an introduction to U.S. Census data using American Factfinder.
Author: Charles Combs
Institution: Sinclair Community College
People are at the root of community profiling: they create the need for planning functions, and they experience the effects - for better or worse - of planning efforts. ""Community Profiling"" is often essential for effective planning. ""Planning"" are synonymous terms; they mean the same. But unless planners know who ""their people"" are and how their characteristics affect - and are affected by - various professional functions, planners cannot fully meet the needs of the population they are profiling. Thus, although it is not a core planning focus, such as land use or transportation, demographic analysis occupies a position of overarching importance in community profiling.
Author: Theresa Ciabattari
Institution: Wake Forest University
We have spent the last few weeks discussing race, class, and gender inequalities and how sociologists conceptualize these inequalities on the structural, rather than the individual, level. In this second research report, you will have the opportunity to apply this structural perspective. You will use U.S. Census data from 1950 to 1990 to analyze shifts in occupational structures in your home state and how these shifts vary by race, sex, or education. This analysis is macro (state) level, so keep this in mind as you are thinking about and writing about your research.
Author: Jennifer Roebuck Bulanda
Institution: Miami University
Census data and data from the American Community Survey are used to examine older adults' employment patterns over four decades, the percentage of older adults who have no health problems limiting their ability to work, and trends in employment status for both younger and older adults. Students must prepare a written report interpreting and integrating their results, and then apply the quantitative information by making recommendations to a business and a non-profit agency.
Author: Jennifer Roebuck Bulanda
Institution: Miami Univeristy
Census data and data from the American Community Survey are used to examine older adults' employment patterns over four decades, the percentage of older adults who have no health problems limiting their ability to work, and trends in employment status for both younger and older adults. Students must prepare a written report interpreting and integrating their results, and then apply the quantitative information by making recommendations to a business and a non-profit agency.
Author: Peter Meiksins
Institution: Cleveland State University
This module introduces students to using census data through three distinct scenarios. First, students must decide where two grocery store chains should go, each with a different target income class. Second, students are responsible for developing an anti-poverty program for each state in the United States. In the third assignment, students will be asked to advise a bookstore called "REALLY BIG BOOKS" about whether it would make sense to locate in Ohio and in Cleveland. REALLY BIG BOOKS is a bookstore specializing in books for collectors, academics, and sophisticated readers.
Author: James A. Vela-McConnell
Institution: Augsburg College
Students will analyze quantitative data and interpret the results, learning about the relevance of education and family type to earnings, how it has changed over time and the relevance of race in understanding these relationships.
Author: Maria Aysa-Lastra
Institution:
Author: Jay Teachman
Institution: Western Washington University
The purpose of this exercise is to examine variations in household structure in the United States according to race and historical period.
Author: Kofi Benefo
Institution: CUNY-Lehman
This module teaches students to think about contemporary race and ethnic diversity in families, to use census data in the sociology of the family, to use computer software to access and analyze census data and to produce and interpret simple statistics.
Author: Kofi Benefo
Institution: CUNY-Lehman
This activity provides a look at race and ethnicity inequality in the United States over time.
Author: Susanne Morgan
Institution: Ithaca College
In this module, students will take a look at race and poverty in the United States in an attempt to determine the relationship between the two. Variables such as age and household type will be taken into consideration.
Author: Stephen Sweet
Institution: Ithaca College
Author: Charles Combs
Institution: Sinclair Community College
This module will introduce students to demographic and statistical language and terms and encourage critical thinking and extrapolation skills.
Author: Kyle Crowder
Institution: Western Washington University
In this module you will have the opportunity to explore the frequency of different types of residential moves carried out by Americans. You will examine some of the basic determinants of residential mobility by looking at variations in different types of mobility by age, marital status, education, and housing tenure.
Author: Mikaila Mariel Lemonik Arthur
Institution: Rhode Island College
In this paper assignment, students will write a paper in the format of a scholarly journal article in which you compare data on four school districts and the state as a whole and connect your findings to theoretical arguments in the sociology of education and stratification. The assignment is designed to help students develop their skills in using and writing about empirical data.
Author: Raymond D'Angelo
Institution: St. Joseph's College
Current and projected data will be used to examine cohort differences among members of various race/ethnic groups as they grow older in order to identify possible political and policy implications for the future. Data from various states and metropolitan cities will be compared.
Author: Raymond D'Angelo
Institution: St. Joseph's College
Current and projected data will be used to examine cohort differences among members of various race/ethnic groups as they grow older in order to identify possible political and policy implications for the future. Data from various states and metropolitan cities will be compared.
Author: Brent Marshall
Institution: University of Central Florida
The population of the United States is becoming more racially and ethnically diverse. This increasing diversity is an important issue because it is changing the cultural, political, and economic landscape of American life.
Author: Bill Morgan
Institution: Cleveland State University
In this module, students will explore trends in education and occupational attainment among minority groups.
Author: Barbara E. Johnson
Institution: University of South Carolina Aiken
This social science lab exercise uses Census data to examine teenage pregnancy in the United States over time and by socio-demographic variables. Students will learn how to access and interpret data as well as begin to think sociologically about teen pregnancy patterns and risk factors.
Author: Rongjun Sun
Institution: Cleveland State University
In the first part of this exercise, students will use the elaboration model to analyze the census data from the SSDAN website. To carry out this study, whey will follow the basic procedures in social research and apply the concepts and techniques that have been discussed in class.
Author: James Chriss
Institution: Cleveland State University
Students will use data from the General Social Survey to explore factors which affect attitudes towards the death penalty.
Author: Elizabeth Jordan
Institution: Kalamazoo College
The focus of this module will be to dispel some misconceptions about teenage motherhood and to introduce students to CHIP.