Browse Modules

Author: Tony Catanese
Institution: DePauw College
Income differences can be measured narrowly or broadly. A narrow definition might include only work for which pay is received, what economists call earnings, which can range from an hour to a year to a lifetime. A less narrow definition of income could add to earnings "unearned" income, which includes sources such as transfer payments, interest and dividends, or capital gains. An even broader definition of income would include wealth, which uses assets and liabilities. Regardless of how one measures income and their differences, the fundamental issues are the same: Why are there income differences within and among countries and what are their patterns? For example, there is a raging public debate about the growing income inequality and decline of the middle class in the United States?
Author: Tim Thorton
Institution: SUNY Brockport
For this assignment we will explore the impact of gender and race on the earnings of full-time workers in 2000.
Author: Barbara Risman
Institution: North Carolina State University
With this assignment, students will learn to create and interpret bivariate and univariate tables to look at race and earnings.
Author: Barbara Risman
Institution: North Carolina State University
This assignment will require you to locate three tables on-line (detailed directions are provided), print them out, interpret the data in the tables, and answer several questions on what you have learned from the tables.
Author: Barbara Risman
Institution: North Carolina State University
With this assignment, students will experience the thrill of "doing" sociology rather than just reading sociological findings.
Author: Meredith Redlin
Institution: South Dakota State University
In this exercise, students respond to some of the survey questions used in Elder and Congers study. A data set is then compiled by the instructor. Students then take on the role as researchers and use their own class data for hypothesis formulation and testing. Student devise original hypotheses using their choice of variables from the data set. The instructor then runs the appropriate test for their hypothesis, and provides students with results (most often crosstabulation tables or reports of means) for final analysis.
Author: Kofi Benefo
Institution: CUNY-Lehman
This activity provides an introduction to U.S. Census data using American Factfinder.
Author: Kathy Rowell
Institution: Sinclair Community College
Students will form hypotheses and analyze data to explore the how of age, race, and family size impact children in poverty in the United States.
Author: Kathy Rowell
Institution: Sinclair Community College
Students will use cross-tabulations and graphs to explore the differences in earnings based on gender. In doing so, they will build basic data analysis skills like forming hypotheses and using control variables.
Author: Kathy Rowell
Institution: Sinclair Community College
Using data from CensusScope and the Population Reference Bureau students will explore trends in segregation and hyper-segegation. They will investigate the multiracial census category and the distribution of multiracial individuals across the nation.
Author: Jill Bouma
Institution: Berea College
Does income differ for men and women, and for whites and people of color? In this exercise, we will examine earnings data for all full-time workers in the US. Students will be able to examine data for the nation as a whole, for Kentucky, and for a state of their choosing.
Author: Adrianne Frech
Institution: University of Akron
This module examines the frequency of disability in the ACS and looks at the rates of marriage between those with and without disabilities.
Author: Charles Combs
Institution: Sinclair Community College
The end of World War II created a dramatic increase in births. Known as the "Baby Boom", this trend continued into the early 1960's. During this period, five out of six women in peak childbearing years gave birth to at least two children. Americans were also marrying and staying married. As baby boomers have matured, they have not followed their parent's marriage and childbearing patterns. Consequently, more people have delayed marriage until their late twenties or early thirties. Couples have both delayed having children and are having fewer children. Divorces have increased as well. Clearly, there no longer seems to be a "singular" marital lifestyle that can be easily identified in American culture.
Author: Kofi Benefo
Institution: CUNY-Lehman
This activity provides a look at marriage and divorce among different race/ethnicity, ages, education and income levels over time.
Author: Charles Combs
Institution: Sinclair Community College
Students will be introduced to data retrival by becoming familiar with CensusScope data.
Author: Theodore Fuller
Institution: Virginia Tech
Occupational sex segregation will be studied by focusing on traditionally gender-oriented occupations and analyzing which have an increasing proportion of males or females, and which are still mainly gender-specific jobs. These analyses will be done by age group to study trends at different stages of people's careers.
Author: Jill Bouma
Institution: Berea College
For this exercise we will: 1) examine sex segregation in employment from 1950 to 2000. 2) examine trends within three specific occupations of your choosing, and 3) for either doctors or lawyers, investigate gender and race differences on earnings and see if these differences change when we control for age.
Author: Kyle Crowder
Institution: Western Washington University
This module provides a gentle introduction to the use of WebCHIP software and census data to investigate basic population issues. In the first part of this module, you will use data from the 1990 U.S. census to create population pyramids for several racial and ethnic groups. These population pyramids provide the ability to view the age and sex structure of a population.
Author: Kofi Benefo
Institution: CUNY-Lehman
This activity provides a look at poverty among different race/ethnic groups and family types over time.
Author: Joan Morris
Institution: University of Central Florida
This exercise focuses on the effects of various social characteristics on poverty. It is based on the sociological assumption that patterns exist in relation to poverty in society.
Author: Joan Spade
Institution: SUNY-Brockport
In addition to a quantitative analysis that involves univariate, bivariate, and multivariate analysis, this module reinforces research terms introduced in Intro to Sociology (independent, dependent and control variables and includes the opportunity to discuss sample vs. population (in the comparison of national poverty data vs. the poverty rate in the sample) and value vs. variable (poverty as a value and a variable and the recoding of the values in the household data).
Author: Joan Spade
Institution: SUNY-Brockport
In addition to a quantitative analysis that involves univariate, bivariate, and multivariate analysis, this module reinforces research terms introduced in Intro to Sociology (independent, dependent and control variables and includes the opportunity to discuss sample vs. population (in the comparison of national poverty data vs. the poverty rate in the sample) and value vs. variable (poverty as a value and a variable and the recoding of the values in the household data).
Author: Tariqah A. Nuriddin
Institution: Howard University
The Data Counts website is intended to engage students in data analysis and quantitative reasoning early on in their respective academic careers. As such, it is a valuable resource for students and instructors alike.
Author: Kathleen Abrahamson, PhD, RN
Institution: Western Kentucky University
This module introduces students to the relationships between age, race/ethnicity, gender, poverty, and disability. It also provides students with an opportunity to use census data to gather information about a target population.