Browse Modules

Author: Jeffrey Lashbrook
Institution: SUNY Brockport
In this exercise, we'll examine contemporary and historical data on financial resources.
Author: James A. Vela-McConnell
Institution: Augsburg College
For this assignment, we will explore the impact of racial affiliation and sex on social class, as represented by socio-economic status (SES): level of education, occupation and income.
Author: Christine McKenna
Institution:
Author: Patricia P. Lynott
Institution: Ithaca College
For this assignment, we will explore differences by gender, race/ethnicity, and age group in social class status and poverty rates among the older population (age 65 or older).
Author: Robert T. Hall
Institution: West Virginia State College
This module examines the disability community and inequality. Students will attempt to determine which is the best indicator of disability and will form a composite to describe the disability community.
Author: Richard Bulcroft
Institution: Western Washington University
This module is designed to illustrate differences in family and household composition patterns for different groups based on race/ethnicity and social class. It also serves as a review of key methodological concepts introduced in the first part of the course.
Author: Jeffrey Leiter
Institution: North Carolina State University
In this module, students will explore the numerous factors contributing to earnings differences, including education and race.
Author: Jennifer Montez
Institution:
This module allows students to examine the health consequences social inequality may have.
Author: Kathy Rowell
Institution: Sinclair Community College
Students will look at correlation and causation by exploring the relationship between high school dropout rates and violent crime, poverty, teenage pregnancy rates, and teenage death rates.
Author: Jill Bouma
Institution: Berea College
Overall, we see that even when controlling for occupation, gender continues to affect earnings: women make less than men. In this exercises, students will examine the influence of education on earnings. Do higher levels of education lead to higher earnings?
Author: Nancy Davis
Institution: DePauw University
Focusing on education, we will examine the changes from 1950 to 1990 in the numbers, race, gender, and occupations of high school and college graduates. Turning our attention to cohorts and population structure, we will trace birth trends over the past four decades, namely the Baby Boom, and discuss possible causes and effects.
Author: Bill Morgan
Institution: Cleveland State University
In this module, students will explore the relationship between immigration status and age in the United States.
Author: Kathy Rowell
Institution: Sinclair Community College
As students investigate Appalachian poverty and its social policy implications, they will explore the difference between correlation and causation, learn about poverty indicators, and practice creating and interpreting graphs.
Author: Elhum Haghighat-Sordellini
Institution: CUNY-Lehman
This module explores the effects of nativity, race, and ethnicity on educational attainment in the U.S.
Author: Chris Carlson
Institution: Cornell College
Students will trace changes in family behavior from 1950 to 1990 and assess their magnitude, considering the pace and timing of these changes. Marital status, number of children and household type will be examined by both race/ethnicity and class. Additional team questions will be introduced that focus on marriage and intimate relationships; fertility and childrearing; divorce; and families and poverty. Students will present answers and supporting data to these questions via class presentations.
Author: Chris Carlson
Institution: Cornell College
Students will trace changes in family behavior from 1950 to 1990 and assess their magnitude, considering the pace and timing of these changes. Marital status, number of children and household type will be examined by both race/ethnicity and class.
Author: Jana Jasinski
Institution: University of Central Florida
"Everyday we have specific routines we engage in. Many of these routines are tailored to preventing us from becoming victims of crime. Although we may not consciously think about it, these routines may be influenced by a variety of factors. What factors might make some individuals more afraid than others"
Author: Wendy D. Manning
Institution: Bowling Green State University
Students will gain an understanding of the change in fertility patterns in the U.S. through an examination of the change of marital status among females, childbearing trends, and how such variables are affected by race/ethnicity.
Author: Jim Wright
Institution: University of Central Florida
In addition to the raw data files that you analyzed in Module One, the US Census makes a great deal of information about cities (and everything else) available through its various publications. Our learning objective in Module Two is to familiarize students with these data resources and their contents by retrieving information on various Florida cities and metropolitan areas.
Author: Heather Fitz Gibbon
Institution: College of Wooster
Urban underclass indicators such as teen pregnancy rates, and joblessness over the last three decades will be compared by race and location (cities versus suburbs) in an effort to explore the determinants of poverty using actual census data.
Author: Jeffrey Lashbrook
Institution: SUNY- Brockport
This exercise will explore the impact of gender on the earnings of full-time workers in general and within a specific occupation.
Author: Kristin Anderson
Institution: Western Washington University
This exercise examines the relationships between marital status and earnings among women aged 25 and over, using data from the 1990 U.S. Census.
Author: Bill Morgan
Institution: Cleveland State University
In this module, students will explore urban residential choice across different populations in New York.
Author: Suzanne R. Goodney-Lea
Institution: University of Michigan-Flint
Students will empirically examine the issues underlying school performance using data that captures some of their own experiences.
Author: Kyle Crowder
Institution: Western Washington University
In this module you will explore some of the impacts of this immigration by examining the characteristics of the foreign-born population, comparing these characteristics to those of the native born population. You will get a chance to explore where immigrants come from, how the composition of the immigrant population has changed, where immigrants settle, and what they do once they get here.