Browse Modules

Author: Alan Grigsby
Institution: University of Cincinnati
Explores contemporary trends in urban sociology
Author: Jeffrey Lashbrook
Institution: SUNY Brockport
The sociologist, Melvin Kohn, argued that people's locations in social structures, particularly the occupational structure, influenced the values they would stress for their children because variations in structural locations exposed them to different experiences.
Author: Sandra Apgar
Institution: Sinclair Community College
Students will interpret CensusScope data regarding segregation exposure and the dissimilarity index from a sociological perspective.
Author: Jason Ford
Institution: University of Central Florida
There is no question that life in America has changed drastically in the past fifty years. Given the importance of examining historical change inherent in the life course perspective, it is important to determine how changes in the social structure over time impact individuals. Therefore, the goals of this data analysis exercise are to examine changes in marriage and employment over the last fifty years. The purposes are to identify the changes that have taken place, and to hypothesize how these changes may affect the process of desistance from crime today.
Author: Jeffrey Lashbrook
Institution: SUNY Brockport
In this exercise, we'll examine contemporary and historical data on financial resources.
Author: Robert T. Hall
Institution: West Virginia State College
This module examines the disability community and inequality. Students will attempt to determine which is the best indicator of disability and will form a composite to describe the disability community.
Author: Jeffrey Leiter
Institution: North Carolina State University
In this module, students will explore the numerous factors contributing to earnings differences, including education and race.
Author: Kathy Rowell
Institution: Sinclair Community College
Students will look at correlation and causation by exploring the relationship between high school dropout rates and violent crime, poverty, teenage pregnancy rates, and teenage death rates.
Author: Nancy Davis
Institution: DePauw University
Focusing on education, we will examine the changes from 1950 to 1990 in the numbers, race, gender, and occupations of high school and college graduates. Turning our attention to cohorts and population structure, we will trace birth trends over the past four decades, namely the Baby Boom, and discuss possible causes and effects.
Author: Kathy Rowell
Institution: Sinclair Community College
As students investigate Appalachian poverty and its social policy implications, they will explore the difference between correlation and causation, learn about poverty indicators, and practice creating and interpreting graphs.
Author: Tim Thorton
Institution: SUNY Brockport
For this assignment we will explore the impact of gender and race on the earnings of full-time workers in 2000.
Author: Charles Combs
Institution: Sinclair Community College
The end of World War II created a dramatic increase in births. Known as the "Baby Boom", this trend continued into the early 1960's. During this period, five out of six women in peak childbearing years gave birth to at least two children. Americans were also marrying and staying married. As baby boomers have matured, they have not followed their parent's marriage and childbearing patterns. Consequently, more people have delayed marriage until their late twenties or early thirties. Couples have both delayed having children and are having fewer children. Divorces have increased as well. Clearly, there no longer seems to be a "singular" marital lifestyle that can be easily identified in American culture.
Author: Kyle Crowder
Institution: Western Washington University
This module provides a gentle introduction to the use of WebCHIP software and census data to investigate basic population issues. In the first part of this module, you will use data from the 1990 U.S. census to create population pyramids for several racial and ethnic groups. These population pyramids provide the ability to view the age and sex structure of a population.
Author: Maxine Atkinson
Institution: North Carolina State University
This activity provides an introduction to U.S. Census data using American Factfinder.
Author: James A. Vela-McConnell
Institution: Augsburg College
Students will analyze quantitative data and interpret the results, learning about the relevance of education and family type to earnings, how it has changed over time and the relevance of race in understanding these relationships.
Author: Kyle Crowder
Institution: Western Washington University
In this module you will have the opportunity to explore the frequency of different types of residential moves carried out by Americans. You will examine some of the basic determinants of residential mobility by looking at variations in different types of mobility by age, marital status, education, and housing tenure.
Author: Jim Wright
Institution: University of Central Florida
Objectives of this first data exercise are: to discover how the present-day US population is distributed across these various census categories; to discover how the distribution has changed over time; and, to see how some of the social characteristics of people who live in cities, suburbs and non-metro areas.